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HENRI MANGUIN

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Henri Manguin (1874 - 1949) glorified the joy of life through Arkadian themes, nude, Mediterranean landscapes, scenes of family life and still lifes. Even during his studies with Gustave Moreau, he discovered impressionism and consistently expressed joyful sensuality.

Henri Manguin decided to become an artist at the age of fifteen, and received his first drawing lessons at the School of Decorative Arts. There he became friends with Albert Marquet and Georges Rouault, and later with Henri Matisse, who attended evening classes. Together they entered the School of Fine Arts, where Gustave Moreau became their tutor. The teacher gave his students more freedom, and they appreciated his tolerant attitude. A few years later, the young people and Andre Derain, Maurice de Vlaminck and Raoul Dufy who joined them organized a new movement - Fauvism.

After the death of Moreau in 1898, Manguin left school, and a year later he moved to a house on Rue Bursault, along with Jeanne Carett, his wife and favorite model. As the son of wealthy parents, he built a collapsible studio in the garden, called former classmates there and hired models for them.

In subsequent years, the artist remained faithful to the features that made him famous, in particular, the simplicity of his forms and dazzling chromatic harmonies. He did not refuse pure tones or screaming colors of the Fauvist period. His carefully thought out, harmonious landscapes with their balanced composition refer the viewer to Cezanne and the classical traditions.
Many of his paintings depict Mediterranean landscapes, which became the height of his work in the direction of Fauvism. Manguin traveled extensively in Southern Europe with Alber Marche. In 1949 he settled in Saint-Tropez, where he soon died, on September 25, 1949.